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Questions to Forester

I have six very large walnut trees on a fence row. All of them have an old rusty wire through the middle. Do they have any value?  Reply-It is doubtful they have signifcant value. Possibly the portion of the trees above the wire will still have value as low quality sawlogs, but the portions containing the wire have no value at all.

Questions to Forester

Loggers have been calling me to buy my timber. I have over one hundred acres of good oak. They all offered me 50% of the value. What should I do?  REPLY: What should you do about the calls you received for your oak timber? Allow me to ask, is your timber ready to be harvested, or is it growing nicely and earning you a favorable rate of return? A thorough, professional analysis of the actual conditions in your forest will reveal its true conditions. Should you sell your timber for 50%? Probably not. Only under rare and specific circumstances should woodland owners ever enter into an agreement to sell their timber on a percentage basis. See our online forestry guide for details on selling timber.

Questions to Forester

Pine beetles have killed all 27 acres of shortleaf pine I had planted 14 years ago. Is there a market for my pine here in east Tennessee? If not, can I deduct my loss on my taxes? REPLY-It is very doubtful that a market can be found within your area for shortleaf pine that is only 14 years old. However, you may very well qualify for a tax deduction (casualty loss) resulting from the unexpected and total loss of your timber investment. Please discuss this matter with your accountant or professional tax advisor.

Questions to Forester

I'm so mad I can't even talk about it. My neighbor had his trees cut and the stupid logger cut over the property line and cut some of my trees. What can I do about it? Who do I sue? REPLY. Please see our on line forestry guide and read about timber trespass in the section on understanding and managing risks. Certainly if the logger cut your timber you are due compensation for the loss of your trees. Please contact us via email or by telephone and we will be glad to evaluate your specific problem in greater detail.

Questions to Forester

We read that there is a market for walnut stumps. Can you tell us who is buying them? REPLY: Frankly, no I don't. I know that stumps are sometimes used in making gunstocks and other products as they offer a very interesting grain pattern. Indeed, I haven't heard of anyone actually buying stumps in Tennessee in many years. Perhaps someone out there who knows of a market will get in touch with us. Questions to Forester

do you have any sort of scale of the cost of appraisal? If my husband and I were to have about 75 acres appraised what would the range of cost be? REPLY. Several factors affect our fee schedule. The location of the property, whether it is pines or hardwoods, is it mountains or swamps, etc. Please contact us via phone or email and we will be glad to address your specific interests and needs.


Questions to Forester

pine beetles killed about 20 acres of pines on my land this year. They were fairly large and I think had a lot of value. How much loss can I write off my taxes? REPLY. Normally, the IRS allows a casualty loss deduction in the amount of your "basis." That is, all you can deduct is whatever original cost you incurred when you planted the trees, or whatever their value was at the time you acquired your property. For additional tax information, please go to http://www.timbertax.org/


Questions to Forester

Marion County-5 acres near Cedar Ridge Cave-who do I contact for Timber info in Southpittsburg area? Ilive in FLorida, just been informed someone is cutting up there? I'm a Concerned absentee land owner-please help. Thanks Catherine McManus. REPLY: You may want to contact the State's Area Forester for Marion County; e.g. Gary Roark at 423/949-3821.


Questions to Forester

Do you do work in Kentucky? How much will it cost? REPLY: Yes, where possible we assist woodland owners in States other than Tennessee. Our fees, of course, are based upon the nature of the assistance you require. Please contact us for additional information.


Questions to Forester

Hello, I own approximately one acre. It has 30 or so trees. They are mostly poplar. They are so thick that they have not been able to branch out other than up at the top. Twice, I have had tree damage to my house. I would like to sell these trees and plant other trees, not so close to each other. I am getting tired of the tops freezing and breaking, and the trees, to me are not nearly as attractive planted so close together. As I said, the limbs are at the very top. Are you interesting in cutting and buying these trees? If not, who is? I live at 260 Belview Road, Springville, Tennessee. (lake area near Pine Point and Buchanan Resort. Thank-you for any information. Terri Johnson sadnan@bellsouth.net REPLY: We do not purchase trees or timber. Our company provides professional forestry services to benefit Tennessee's woodland owners. Frankly, you will have trouble selling so few trees, especially on a lot. Few buyers will be interested. We will email you our thoughts on how you might proceed.


Questions to Forester

I OWN A 120 ACRE PLOT THAT I AM INTERESTED IN TIMBERING. I IS LOCATED IN SCOTT COUNTY, TN. IN RESEARCHING TIMBERING PRICES AND CONSULTING INTITIALLY WITH A FORRESTER IN THE AREA IT APPEARS THAT TIMBER PRICES IN THAT AREA ARE CONSIDERABLY LOWER. DO YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION ON $MBF FOR THAT AREA FOR A TRACT THAT CONSISTS OF POPLAR 50%, HARD MAPLE 15%, BASSWOOD 10%RED OAK, WHITE OAK, CHESTNUT OAK ALL 5% AND THE REMAINDER HICKORY, ASH, CHERRY AND WALNUT? I HAVE RESEARCHED ONLINE AND IT APPEARS THAT TEMBER PRICES IN TN HAVE INCREASED OVER THE LAST YEAR BUT NOT IN THIS EASTER AREA.  REPLY:   Thanks!! What great (and very complex) questions!  You are right; timber prices have been rising steadily across Tennessee.  The short answer to your question though, is that general pricing guides can serve as a helpful index of overall market conditions, but should be interpreted very cautiously.  We are very wary about using general pricing information.   Since we have never visited your property, we would be relying on pure guesswork to attempt to put a value on your trees.  And too, since we don't know the sources of your information, please allow us to similarly respond in a general  manner.

Overall, the species you listed are highly desirable in today's market, but there is much more to know about your trees. What is their size, stocking and quality?  Is old fire damage present? What are the logging conditions?  What is the access?  What special conditions would you require in a sale?  All of these factors and many others will greatly affect the value of your trees.  

In reality, timber prices reflect the value of lumber throughout a global marketplace.  So (assuming equal grades), poplar lumber manufactured in the Scott County area will sell for the same price in the market as lumber produced in other areas of Tennessee.  However, logging in mountainous (and often remote) terrain significantly affects the wood industry's operating costs in your area.  Those costs naturally influence the average prices paid for standing timber and delivered logs.  Very simply, the higher the operating costs, the less industry can pay for raw materials and still earn a profit in a highly competitive economic environment.

Not uncommonly, purchasers will travel up to 100 miles to buy a stand of high value trees.  If you have desirable sawtimber, there are potentially 100 or more buyers in Tennessee and Kentucky who might have an interest in your tract.  Pricing guides simply cannot evaluate the full breadth of this complex market, and they may not truly reflect the far wider range of actual or potential market conditions. 

Remember, average prices are determined from adding low numbers to high numbers and then dividing.  When selling timber, you want to sell to the buyers who offer the very highest prices, and you should never rely on guesswork.  The only way that you can be sure to get the full value for your timber is to conduct a thorough inventory and appraisal of the trees to be harvested, then solicit competitive bids throughout a full range of potential buyers.  Those are precisely the services we offer to our clients.   

I realize this response has been somewhat generalized.  Please contact us if you would like for us to visit with you in person on your land.   Thank you again for your great questions and insight.   


Questions to Forester

Hi. I live in a rural part of Gibson County, Tennessee, and we don't have a lot of timber, but we have 3-4 black walnut trees. They are not dead, but for some reason the branches will no longer put out leaves but still produces plenty of walnuts. They are unsightly on our 2 acre property, and the amount of nuts falling to the ground drives us crazy. My husband is considering cutting the trees down, then someone told him they might have some value for timber/veneer. I figure if they are valuable then other people would be selling off all their walnut trees! So I'm skeptical. Do you know anything about this? Thanks.   REPLY: Walnuts can sell for extremely high prices.  However, veneer standards are very exacting as regards both the size and quality of individual trees.  Few trees make the grade.  You can make a quick assessment yourself.  Measure their circumference at roughly chest height.  Then divide the circumference by 3.  This will give you an approximate measurement of their diameters.  If they exceed 20 inches in diameter they might qualify for veneer.  But, the next thing you must look at is their appearance.  You must have a minimum of 8-1/2 feet of clear trunk.  That is, they must have no limbs, and show no old limb scars or other blemishes of any kind.  Even minor blemishes matter.  If you think they might make veneer grade, then give us a call for further information.  Even though they have limbs or blemishes, they could still have value for lumber, provided logs can be cut from them.  If your trees are more than 14 inches in diameter, logs should be cut 8-1/2 feet long or longer in 2 ft. increments with a minimum of a ten inch diameter at the small end.  Since you only have 3-4 trees, you would have to cut them yourself, and deliver them on a trailer or truck to a sawmill.  They won't bring a great deal of money as sawlogs, but it might be a reasonable option. 



Questions to Forester

My siblings and I own 147 acres on the Shelby/Tipton County line. There are 88 acres of loblolly pine trees we planted 15 years ago. We are interested in selling the property. Are 15 year old pine trees marketable?  REPLY:  Not in today's market.  Both demand and prices are down for pine pulpwood, and there would be very little interest in 15 year old trees at this time.  Even under the best of times, pulpwood mills are reluctant to accept trees that young.  However, you are getting very close to having desirable trees.  Due to structural changes within the actual wood fibers associated with aging, in only another year or two they will become acceptable by most markets.  We suggest waiting for a couple of years while watching market conditions to best time a sale. 


Questions to Forester

i live in church hill tn, i own about 6 acres of woodland, i am about to sell my propery. i know the land will be developed due to the location, should i sell my timber? how do i begin?  REPLY. I believe you are in Hawkins County,  but if you will go to the following link, I believe you will  find the State's Area Forester serving your county. Probably your best source for the information you need can be provided by your Area Forester.   http://www.state.tn.us/agriculture/forestry/tdffo.html 


Questions to Forester

I live 90 miles South of Tampa on Floridas west coast and have access to approx 5 acres of 10 year old pine stumps and wood chips--Is there a market for this type of material ? Thanks  REPLY. No market exists for pine stumps in Tennessee, but I have no idea about south Florida.


Questions to Forester

I am in Henry Co. TN. Do you know where I could find a buyer for walnut stumps and roots? Where could I complain about a timber cutter's equipment damaging my trees that were left? Leaving brush over creek banks, getting a skidder stuck in a spring, leaving garbage, leaving cut logs lying in woods, etc...... How much skinning of bark will a tree recover from? And will the skinned tree have less value when it is large enough to sell? Skidders should be outlawed.  REPLY. We have been down this path before, but have not found a market for walnut stumps in Tennessee.  With respect to skidder damage to remaining trees, I would have to refer you to the contract you had with the harvester.  Trees can recover from some bark damage, but extensive damage can result in mortality. Some damage always occurs during a harvest operation, but possible carelessness and negligence on the part of the operator, utilization standards and the removal of garbage should be considered prior to selling your timber and addressed in your sale contract.   Tennessee has harvesting regulations regarding damage to water resources.  If you believe these regulations were violated, contact your Area Forester, Rick Stutts at 731-364-3430, or Forestry Technician, Sonny Baker at 731-642-3808.   The harvester may be liable for mitigating water quality damage, but remember, you are ultimately responsible for everything that happens on your land.  Skidders are a good tool when used properly. 


Questions to Forester

Hello, I live in Mexico and I am researching on investing in land and plant hardwood trees. Is it a good business down here in Mexico? REPLY.  I haven't a clue.  Try the following site, but you need to contact someone in Mexico.

 

 http://www.cucba.udg.mx/es/divcsag/deppf/deppf.html


Questions to Forester

There is a highway slated to go through our farm, and we are thinking of cutting old cedar that is in it's path. Where would we find a market for cedar logs near Franklin Co. Tennessee. The lumber man who has looked at the forest is interested only in hardwood and said for us to find a separate buyer for the cedar and few pine trees we have.  REPLY:  There is no shortage of cedar on the market throughout middle Tennessee.  Unless you have a sizeable quantity you could have trouble moving it.  Commonly it is used in manufacturing furniture, pencils and animal bedding.  Try contacting Cedar Products Company in Nashville at 615-646-9494 or Jim Owen in Smith County at 615-735-9226.


Questions to Forester

We live in Ohio on five acres with about 25 black walnut tree's, they all are over 100 yrs. old( they are buetiful)but messy!We were told they were very valueable because how large in size and how high they are before the first branch. Are they very valuable and who in Ohio should we contact? REPLY: Ohio walnuts can be very valuable provided they have the characteristics that buyers are looking for.  Check the Landowner Assistance link at the following information source for forestry services in Ohio.

http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/forestry/


Questions to Forester

I have a 32 acre tract of timber that is mostly red cedar. I am trying to find someone who be intrested in harvesting it for me. The tract hasn't be cut in approx. 30 yrs or more and looks to be of very good quality. I need to find someone who might be intrestedREPLY: Call Cedar Products Co. (615) 646-9494 and Parsons Handle and Cedar Mill (931) 823-7161. 



Questions to Forester

I have several black walnut trees that I would like to consider selling for harvest. They're quite straight and range anywhere from 72" to 30" in circumference. The problem is that I don't know how much to ask. Should I ask the buyer whether it is going to be for gunstock or for veneer? Could you give me a general idea? Here's the run down... one is 40 ft with a circ. of 60" very straight. another is shorter and stockier, it is 72" around and is 15 feet to the crotch but has several 10' sections for a total of around 35' straight stock. There's another 35 footer that is straight up with a circ. of 64" The last one forks out of the ground. It has a good 20' of 30 inch circ. and 15' of 38 inch circ. I'm guessing that I have at least 145 feet of marketable wood. HELP, please....REPLY: You should not worry about how any given buyer intends to use your trees, but rather how much they will pay for them.  Therefore, you need to contact several potential buyers and take the highest offer.  The walnut market is very hot right now, so your timing is good.  Regrettably, too many specific, technical variables apply to assess the value of your trees.  Based upon their sizes,  it seems the first three trees you described could be valuable.  The forked tree is relatively small, and would seemingly have little value.  However, an equally essential consideration is the quality of each tree which cannot be assessed with the information provided.  In general;  Size + Quality + Marketing = $Value.  Visit the following website and contact the Area Forester serving your county.  Ask them to look at the trees and provide you with further guidance. http://www.state.tn.us/agriculture/forestry/tdffo.html

 


Questions to Forester

I have a rather large Poplar tree that just got struck by lightining. I am sure that the tree will eventually die. Is there a market for such a tree? Can you give me some info? Knoxville, TN.  REPLY: Sorry, but you will not find a market for a single, lightning-struck tree.  


Questions to Forester

We cut 200 acres of hardwoods 5 years ago in Lauderdale co. There was no effort to reforrest because we were told by the consultant that hardwoods would regenerate naturally. Should we go in now an study the success of the regeneration with someone to see if we need to do anything to help the process? Is there someone in the state forrestry who provides that service? We were told that the trees could be harvested every 20 years. REPLY: The consultant was correct, your forest will naturally regenerate.  Commonly, many thousand young seedlings will become established following a harvest, and will naturally thin themselves out as young trees begin to develop.  Unless some event such as a fire or grazing effects their development, you should not expect any problems.  However, you can contact the State's Area Forester, Steve Brabec in Ripley at 731-635-4799 and ask for an assessment.  The number of years between harvests varies considerably.  Factors include land quality, species types and the manner in which the last harvest was conducted.


Questions to Forester

I'm interested in Cedar Logs, around the athens area, could you refer me to a supplier and what is the availability of the product in this area? Large and small logs. REPLY: Contact the Tennessee Forestry Association at 615-883-3832, and ask that they send you a list of Tennessee's Master Loggers.  From that list you can find loggers working in your area.


Questions to Forester

Central Calif. What is the value of 15-20 burls (frankette and payne).Trees planted 40 years ago.  REPLY: I don't know.  Please contact one or more of the 24 private foresters who are members of the National Association of Consulting Foresters in California.  Contact your State Forester for further assistance.


Questions to Forester

i have 350 acres of land in whitley county, kentucky, apparently it is 95% covered in trees, unfortunately i havent seen the land but as i understand things it is dense with woodland, on a hilly terrain...i have no clue what type of trees are on the land, i want to sell it all but i am not sure if its best to sell the timber or to sell it lock stock and barrel, i live in florida, and i am a little lost on this, any suggestions?, many thanks. w.tye  REPLY: Commonly it is best to sell good quality timber prior to selling the property.  Licensed land appraisers normally fail to recognize the full value of a valuable stand of trees, and rarely will lending institutions offer a mortgage greater than the appraised value.   So, potential property buyers are at a disadvantage when buying high value timberland.  You need to have the timber evaluated, so call us if you would like for us to assist you.


Questions to Forester

Is it more profitable to sell the timber rights on an area of land or just sell the land and the timber all at the same time?  REPLY:  See above


Questions to Forester

SELLING PRICE OF TIMBER REPLY:  Overall market conditions are excellent at this time, but of course the selling price varies by individual types and quality of trees, as well as other considerations including location, ease of access, topography, etc.


Questions to Forester

I HAVE SPENT SATURDAY SEPT.20 LOOKING FOR POSSIBLE SIGHTS TO PURCHASE THAT INCLUDE AREAS FOR STANDING TIMBER.ALTHOUGH I HAVE A LIMITED KNOWLEDGE OF TIMBER,I DID FIND 2 OR3 TRACTS FROM 55TO 80ACRES.THESE TRACTS INCLUDE TIMBER THAT GENERALLY STAND ON A RIDGE TO A SLOPE.I WOULD LOVE TO HAVE A CONSULTANTS ADVICE AS TO THE QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF THE TIMBER.WHAT FEES CAN I EXPECT AND WILL THEY GIVE ADVICE ON SIGHTS THAT ARE NOT OWNED,BUT COULD BE PURCHASED IN THE FUTURE? REPLY: Selecting the property that best meets your objectives can be a time consuming and complex process.  You might want to review Chapter ELEVEN in our On-Line guide.  Remember too, ridge tops may not produce high value timber due to soil moisture limitations, and north and east facing slopes are preferred over west and south slopes for the same reason.  Our fees vary by the exact nature and location of the work to be done.  Please contact us for details.


Questions to Forester

I live in Maryland, just outside of Washington, DC. A neighbor who is originally from Tennessee tells me that the two black walnut trees in our back yard are very valuable. Both are about 75 years old and about 100-120 feet tall (bases are 5 foot and 3 foot diameter respectively), with lots of 12-30 foot straight sections. Do you know how I can find someone what will have information on there value and firms that would harvert them. Thanks. REPLY: Try the following site for forestry consultants in Maryland.  Contact one or more in your immediate area.    http://www.dnr.state.md.us/forests/forester.html


Questions to Forester

Would like to know if poplar 100 ft tall and over 2 ft across are ready to timber off. Also what would each tree bring. Thanks, E.Dodson REPLY: Yes, it sounds as though your trees are economically mature; that is, from the standpoint of the market they are ready to harvest.  I cannot and should not hazard a guess as to their value as too many factors can influence what trees can bring in a well structured and advertised sale. 


Questions to Forester

Is it possible for a timber company not be able to harvest timber on someone's property due to the Clean Water Act? REPLY:  You pose an interesting question.  I have not encountered such a situation.  It's possible I suppose on a very small tract of land, but I cannot visualize such a quandary on a relatively large tract in Tennessee, unless perhaps an access issue prevented moving equipment onto the property.  


Questions to Forester

Is there a law that says Best Management Practices has to be used when logging? REPLY: No, BMP's are voluntary in Tennessee with the exception of certain wetlands practices.  However,  loggers can be held in violation of the Clean Water Act and may be subject to fines should they actually create a point source pollution problem.  Very simply, loggers are not required to apply BMP's, but may be liable if they actually pollute streams.  Procedures for addressing water quality violations associated with logging activities are well defined in a joint  memorandum between the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Water Pollution Control and the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Division of Forestry.  It is absolutely essential that woodland owners realize that it is they who are ultimately responsible for every action that occurs on their property, and we can help them protect their interests during a harvest operation.


Questions to Forester

I have several large red oaks that are 20-30 inches at the base and must be removed. I plan to cut into approximately 16 ft lengths and can transport. Can you reference a buyer in the Tullahoma or Middle TN area? REPLY:  You might call the Burroughs-Ross-Colville Co. in McMinnville.  931-473-2111
 


Questions to Forester

how much does it cost for a forester to evaluate my 25-35 acres REPLY: Depending upon exactly what you want and where you are located there may be no charge for an initial inspection.  Please give us a call (Toll Free) at 1-866-968-2953 or hit us with an email and we can be more specific. 


Questions to Forester

timber sales REPLY: I'm sorry, what is your question?

 


Questions to Forester

I'm thinking about selling my timber.  Is it a good time to sell? What is happening with timber prices? REPLY: In most situations we are advising clients to take advantage of the current excellent market conditions.  At this time, sawtimber values for most species and grades of hardwoods and pine are very high across Tennessee.  Pulpwood prices vary depending upon your location in the state.  Please follow our Newsletter for general market information and updates. 

 


Questions to Forester

I have about an acre of loplolly pines I would like to have cut. I would like to know to current market prices for this timber. I was told it could only be used as pulp wood and it would sell or $4.00 per ton. This seems like a low price to me. Please help. Angela REPLY: It is not economically feasible to harvest your trees if you have only one acre of pine pulpwood.  Frankly, you will be fortunate if anyone will pay you any price for it.  $4.00/ton may be very close in today's market depending on where your property is located.


Questions to Forester

I have 40+ acre of timber untouched diversed forestry family property left to me in family will. Thinking of timbering it, or selling it. It's in WVA, Ihave not seen it in 40 years+. I had consultant look at it. He says it's fantastic. Lots of exceptional large oak, hemmlock trees, creeks, river running through it, a cover of tree that are of commercial size. How do I get in touch with a reputable company? REPLY: By a "reputable company" I hope and certainly recommend that you use the services of a forestry consultant in your area.  Under no circumstances should you attempt to sell your trees without the assistance of a qualified professional.  Please visit the following link to find a top-notch consultant operating near you in West Virginia.  Association of Consulting Foresters


Questions to Forester

Dear Sirs, We are in the process of working with the King George, VA Sheriff's office in the prosecution of several men caught stealing 8 to 10 trees off our property. I am not sure which variety they are, only that the diameters range from 18" to 32" in diameter, with nominally spaced growth rings (anywhere from 6 to 12 per inch). Detective Norris has asked that I determine the value so that the appropriate charges may be applied to these men. Any help would be appreciated.   REPLY: You need the assistance of a qualified professional consultant in your area that can identify the species and value of each tree that was cut on your property.  As with the recommendation above, visit the  link below to find assistance near you in Virginia.  Once at the site, at the left menu click on "Find a Forester."  Then on the next page "Find Members by State/Province," go down to the drop down box and select VA.  Then click on "Search Foresters" and you will find a list of 23 competent consultants operating in Virginia.  Best wishes in resolving your problem.  Association of Consulting Foresters

 


Questions to Forester

Wade, My first visit to your website. Very impressive, easy to navigate. Can you provide a website where I can get prices for the various tree species for the West Tennesse markets? Also, can you provide an easy formula for estimating board feet in a tree? Thanks, Gary Beckstead Blue Goose REPLY: Gary, thanks for your kind comments, and I truly enjoyed walking over your property with you.  There is no single pricing source for West Tennessee markets that can be applied across the board for all trees on all tracts.  There is simply far too much variability, especially regarding individual tree quality, for a "one size fits all" pricing guide.  I suggest finding a website that provides a Doyle Scale board feet volume table.  From that table you can get a direct read for the estimated board feet for any tree based upon your own measurements. 


Questions to Forester

I have 300 acres planted in Pines about twenty years ago located in West Tennessee. I am concerned about the pine beetle which has destroyed trees in east TN affecting my investment. Is this a concern or should I be patient and wait for them to grow more. The farm was given to me by my father so I am unsure what to do.  REPLY: There is always a risk from insects, diseases, fires, storms, etc. but none of these elements should be cause for great concern.  Certainly the pine beetle epidemic in east Tennessee was catastrophic for many landowners.  Those same beetles also occur in west Tennessee, although the western region of the state has never experienced the widespread damage seen back east.  The best way to minimize beetle damage is to keep your pine forest healthy and growing vigorously.  If your twenty year old pines have not been thinned they certainly should be at the earliest possible time to prevent them from becoming or remaining over-crowded.  Properly conducted thinnings keep your trees in much better condition and more resistant to a beetle outbreak if it should occur.


Questions to Forester

what do i do with my property? it'sgot pines falling like rain at every wind storm. just bought a year ago. have cut much for fire wood. have little time to harvest myself. have everything from cedar to oak to poplar. couple of walnut. 16 acres is all lots of steep to it then so easy as well. well accessed road to all areas of the property  REPLY: See reply below.


Questions to Forester

great site i also posted the question about, all the falling pines. would it be more advantageous for me to cut my own and try to sell over time. or would i benefit from contracting all at once. only certain areas have the pine problems but there are others that will soon be just the same way. i believe i have some small value in some wihite and red oak. also have some poplar overshadowing all else with measuered cir. at 7 feet, guessed diam. 2 feet or so. straight as can be. i have turckey and deer that i don't want to desturb. i am looking to clean up my land and manage it for timber and wildlife and at the same time put some money in my pocket. but with my time and just being myself working may take too long. i am also covered up with some kind of crawling vine that covers everything. it's not grape,looks somewhat like honeysuckle but have found an herbicide yet that will kill it for good. it keeps coming back. this property has been let go. REPLY:  It certainly sounds like you have your hands full.  You have a number of issues we need to work through in detail.  We will be in touch.


Questions to Forester

i recnetly had a forester come to my 20 acre home and explain lots of issues to me. mostly he told me to leave it all just like it is. he said i had no real value in what trees i had. the trees that are mature enough to harvest are on a old non existant farm fence (which i never noticed before) even though these bottom portion of these trees is no good wouldn't only the 4' section on the bottm be bad? would the other 10' or more be of value? also, if i do go and harvest these trees, and more that i choose, would that decision knock me out of having a stewardship forrest? REPLY: The Forest Stewardship Program contains several requirements, one of which is that you must maintain at least 10 acres of woodland.  The trees along the fence should still have some, though small value.  The fence (metal) causes staining that generally extends upward through the tree above the fence line.  The staining significantly reduces the value of the trees. 


Questions to Forester

i have two walnut trees that measure 20 and 17 inches in dia. one has a 2' spot at the bottom that has the wound on it from years ago where the bark is now healing. i can get an easy 8' section out of one and an easy 10 out of the other. what would be a low number for these logs to bring at the current low rate. i am trying to figure if it would br worth the time and cutting the one in my yard. REPLY: Walnut values vary considerably depending in part on where you are.  From your description it does not sound as though your trees have any great value.  The number of board feet in a tree is determined by measuring the log diameter inside the bark at the small end end of the log, plus of course the log length.  I am going to assume you have about a 14 inch diameter on the logs, and based on the lengths you described, each tree will contain 50-60 board feet.   I'm further going to assume the logs are no better than low quality sawlogs.  Given a wide range of possible variables I would guess your logs would be worth somewhere in the range of $20 - $35 each delivered to a sawmill.


Questions to Forester

I would like to know the value of my timber, before i cut it dowm and deliver it to a saw mill. This way I would know if it is worth the effort and if the saw mill is trying to low ball me because I am a home owner? REPLY: Please give us a call or send an email and we will discuss your appraisal needs with you.


Questions to Forester

Thanks for a very useful and informative web site. I wold like to post 2 questions. We are clearing a home site in a suburban region of D.C. that has about six pretty old Red and white oaks, 90 to 120 inch circumferences at chest height. 30 to 40 feet to the first boughs. Is it worth a loggers time to come and take them? DO red or white oak have any value?  REPLY: Frankly, I am unfamiliar with the opportunity to sell trees in Washington, D.C., although having been in the area I know some wonderful trees can be found there.   Your trees certainly sound as though they have good size and quality, and potentially some value.  Commonly red and white oaks are valuable.  Please go to our link for the Association of Consulting Foresters here at our site.  Use the "Find a Forester" button at their site and search for a qualified forestry consultant near you who will be able to answer your questions.


Questions to Forester

My husband and I are looking at buying 154 acres and want to sell about 50 acres of the timber. Where do we start? REPLY: See Chapter Eleven in our Online Forestry Guide.  How important is the sale of the 50 acres of timber as a part of your 154-acre investment? You must begin by knowing your plan is feasible.  Has the timber been appraised to ensure that you can actually sell the 50 acres of timber, and if so, for how much?  Don't guess; get an appraisal on the front end as it may prevent a mistake down the road.


Questions to Forester

i HAVE SEVERAL SMALL AND LARGE AREAS OF HARDWOOD MIXED TIMBER TO SELL, THE LARGEST WAS CUT 14 AND ABOVE 6 YEARS AGO AND IS COMMING BACK WELL, COULD I HAVE IT CLEAR CUT BY THE TON AND FIND ANYONE THAT WOULD WANT TO AND AT WHAT PRICE, I ALSO HAVE AROUND 10 ACRES OF WALNUT AND OAK THAT HAS NEVER BEEN CUT, ALSO ONE 8 ACRE WOOD WITH HARDWOOD AND MIXED WOOD I WANT CLEARED HOW DO I FIND A LOGGER TO DO IT AND WHAT IS BY THE TON PRICE NOW ?  REPLY: It's likely you will have to sell all of your woodlots together to have enough wood to attract a buyer.  The area cut 6 years ago probably contains primarily pulpwood, but without seeing it I have no idea whether there is a sufficient quantity of timber remaining to make it worthwhile to log it.  Hardwood pulpwood prices have held up reasonably well this summer, ($4.00-$8.00/ton) depending on where you are.   Hardwood sawtimber prices, of course, relate to species, quantity, quality access and other issues.  It sounds like you have about 18 acres of sawtimber, so your best market may be a sawmill rather than a logger.  Often, a sawmill will purchase a sawtimber tract and remove pulpwood as well.   


Questions to Forester

what would a 16'6" white oak log 2 foot at the small end bring finacially. in calling local sawmills, why do their prices differ so much? REPLY: By your measurements, the log you described contains approximately 424 board feet (Doyle Scale).  Its value is based upon the grade (quality), but assuming an average quality sawlog, in round numbers it should be around $150.00 -$175.00 delivered to a sawmill.  You are correct, prices offered can vary quite a bit among sawmills.  Commonly, these variations are associated with the price individual mills receive for their lumber or other products, log utilization, manufacturing efficiency, and on-site, value-added capabilities. 


Questions to Forester

I am interested in finding out if there are any mills in the Middle TN area that accept logs that individuals bring in from there own farms. I don't want my property logged but there are several trees that I would like to haul to the mill myself the majority of them are veneer quality black walnuts or very good quality black walnuts. Do you charge for this advice? Thanks for your time.  REPLY: Thanks for your questions Jon.  I responded to your email, and I hope the information heads you in the right direction.


Questions to Forester

Just recently visited your state. What's that "green vine like growth" that seems to covers the trees, ground, etc? I see nothing like that here in NJ. REPLY:  Kudzu!!  It's an invasive species imported from Asia.  Kudzu loves our climate here in the South, and it grows like wildfire, rapidly covering the ground and trees.  It's incredibly difficult and expensive to control.  So believe me, if you don't already have it you don't want any in N.J. 


Questions to Forester

is poplar trees a hardwood and are the log prices worth the trouble of selling mine i have 40 trees all straight and all over 136 inches in diameter on the stump how do i figure out how many board feet are in them i was offered 200 dollars a 1000 board feet like they are REPLY: It sounds as though you may have some really nice trees.  Yellow poplar is considered a hardwood, but commonly called a "soft hardwood."  Determining board feet is a bit of a challenge for those who aren't experienced in measuring trees.  Tree volume is a function of tree diameter measured at 4- 1/2 ft. above the ground, and the number of 16 ft. long logs that can be cut from each tree.  Knowing that, you can simply look up the volumes in a volume table.  The offered price is close to current market conditions for yellow poplar.


Questions to Forester

I am looking for someone in the state of Georgia that buys Black Walnut Trees or the Walnuts that they bare. If you have any idea of someone in the area who does so I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks.  REPLY: There are many walnut markets, but the best for you I cannot say.  Contact someone near you at the Georgia Forestry Commission http://www.gfc.state.ga.us/as a place to start.  I also strongly suggest that you contact a qualified (ACF member) forestry consultant near you Association of Consulting Foresters


Questions to Forester

How would I go about finding a reliable logger to come in and purchase standing timber from me? I have about 5 or 6 acres of land that I would like to clear out behind my home. REPLY: Finding anyone willing to cut only five acres of timber will be difficult unless your trees are very, very good and easily accessed.  Where are you located?  Let's start there, and maybe I can find someone for you.


Questions to Forester

Terrific website. I recently purchased a skoshe over 6300 acres on both sides of the Kentucky/Tennessee border. I bought the land as an investment. I don't know much about timber but I do understand that it has value. I inherited 725 acres near Roanoke Virginia three years ago. Both properties have timber on them but I don't want to cut it all at once. I would like to manage the timber long term for income but clearcutting is out of the question. I want the land to pay for itself if possible. How is this done and do consultants do this or should I call one of the big lumber companies. If this is consultant work, do you work in KY or VA? If not, can you direct me to someone that does? If not, what lumber companies can you recommend to help me? Should I call the state Department of Forestry? Any advice would be appreciated. Thank you. -Joseph, Pittsburg PA. REPLY: Thank you for your kind comments and inquiry.  Yes, we work in both Kentucky and Virginia as well as Tennessee and other states. The acreages you describe should be more than adequate to manage your forests on a long-term, sustainable basis.  Initially, an overall assessment of the tracts would be needed to, among other things, establish and prioritize harvest units (stands).  Then, a harvest schedule can be designed that will permit both immediate and periodic income, the scope of which will depend largely on your needs.    Managing large tracts involves a process whereby you know what you have, know what you want, and then map out a plan to get there.  This process is best understood and implemented by a consulting forester who fully understands your objectives, and solely represents your interests.  Please give us a call and we will discuss your needs in greater detail.


Questions to Forester

What is LEV?  REPLY: My goodness, what a question!!!  I am going to assume that your question relates to the financial expression, "Land Expectation Value" (LEV).  In effect, LEV is a complex method of calculating the current bare land value for a given tract based upon compounding all costs and discounting expected future forest incomes.  Calculating LEV may benefit some very large corporate investors with a virtually limitless time horizon, but in my opinion has little practical application for the average woodland owner.


Questions to Forester

Hello, Thank you for your site, it is very helpful. What trees should I choose to plant? I have 30+ acres of bottom land in McNairy county that Id like to plant in an effort to grow grade 1 or 2 hardwood, but Im having a difficult time finding enough information to make me feel confidant w/ my tree choice. I was thinking of red oak, white oak, birch, yellow poplar, or maybe ash. I realize it is difficult to answer my question w/o more info, but do you have any quick advice for the novice? I currently have appx 100 acres of pine between 3-8 years old.   REPLY:  Thank you for your kind comments. Congratulations on creating what sounds like a great tree farm, and you are wise to seriously assess your many tree planting options on your 30 acres of bottomland.   I replied to your email, but again, I am not a strong advocate of planting hardwoods.  It is my opinion that the complexity, cost and high risk associated with establishing and maintaining hardwood plantations simply does not pay off for most landowners.   I do not see an incentive to plant hardwoods unless you are doing so on a limited basis for wildlife or other non-timber benefit.  You already know about the opportunities and requirements for loblolly pine plantations, so I suggest that you stay with what you know.


Questions to Forester

WE JUST HAD A POPLAR AND A WHITE OAK CUT, WE HATE TO SEE THEM GO AS FIRE WOOD. THE WHITE OAK IS 36" ACROSS AT THE CUT AND @40+/- FEET LONG THE POPLAR IS AS LONG, BUT NOT AS LARGE. IS THERE A KOGGING CO WHO WOULD BE INTERESTED IN THESE? THE HARD PART IS DONE, THE LOGS AR LAYING ON THE GROUND. THE WHITE OAK IS HEALTHY, WE NEEDED IT DOWN BEFORE A STORM TOOK IT DOWN. EDGE OF HILLSIDE. @80 YEARS OLD  REPLY: Unless you are very close to a sawmill,  it's doubtful that you will find a logger willing to pick them up.  The cost of moving logging equipment to your property to load the logs, then transporting them to a sawmill commonly outweighs the value of only a couple of trees even though they are already cut. 


Questions to Forester

I have two black walnut trees that I would like to sell. Both trees are over 100 years old and have over a six feet dia. at the base. What would be my next step. I live in PA.  REPLY:  Wow, your trees might have significant value.   But don't guess, get an appraisal from an unbiased source.  Find a competent forestry consultant in PA by visiting http://www.acf-foresters.org.  Click on Find a Forester and search PA; there are many good consultants in your state so you should find one or more near you.


Questions to Forester

I saw you had many questions on selling black walnuts,but none were from Michigan. My son has a 100 foot black walnut he would like to see, but does not know who to contact. Could you please give us some suggetions.  REPLY:  We do seem to get a lot of questions about black walnuts.  Obviously, most people are aware of their potential high value.  Northern walnuts are highly sought after because of their desirable color and texture, but as always, their value comes down to quality, quality, quality.   You need an unbiased expert to make the value determination, so once again I recommend that you find a qualified forestry consultant near you in Michigan by visiting  http://www.acf-foresters.org


Questions to Forester

We recently purchase 40.5 ac of timber in Montgomery County TN and having read other questions, it looks unlikely for us to sell 5-6ac of timber in order to clear land for a log home. Given this, where is the market to sell small portions to local businesses or homeowners for consumption? I assume the pricing is different for this type of sale and what is the best way to go about it? We dont know what's on the land- do we ask a registered forester to complete a certfied survey just in case we have to sell it for some reason and for our own use? Great site! REPLY: Probably your best bet for initial information is to contact Michael Huddleston, your state forester there in Clarksville.  You can reach him at 931-552-3909.  It is common for prices to drop on small areas of trees due to economies of scale.  The "move-in" and "set-up" expenses for a logger are the same whether they are cutting 5 acres or 100 acres, so they commonly pay less on small areas to offset their fixed expenses.  Give Michael a call and he can get you started.  If you recently purchased the tract your tax exposure should be minimal because the trees you are selling haven't gained in value since you purchased them.  Remember, you only pay taxes on on your "profit."


Questions to Forester

I have a piece of property in Dickson County with several nice Black walnut trees that are untouched, and I am looking for a buyer to do a turn key job on them (cut, remove, etc.) Do you know who the best resourse for this is in middle Tennessee?  REPLY: There is no one single best market for walnut trees.  Depending upon the number, size and quality of your trees any number of buyers could be interested in them.  All things being equal, the best market is the one that is willing to pay the most for your trees on any given day.  Give us a call a we'll see if we can help.


Questions to Forester

what is the per acre cost to set and raise paulonia in west tennessee.  REPLY: I don't know the cost, but I recommend that you further your investigation of paulownia markets before committing to planting.  Demand has been low for this species, and at this time we can't find buyers for planted paulownia.  Perhaps demand will pick up, but be advised we consider this a very high risk practice.


Questions to Forester

I OWN APPROXIMATELY 9 ACRES IN VIRGINIA AND I AM INTERESTED IN SELLING THE PULP WOOD OFF OF THE PROPERTY. HOW CAN I GO ABOUT SELLING IT AN WHAT IS THE GOING RATE? REPLY: I suggest that you first find a consulting forester in your area to design an appropriate harvest, and locate a competent buyer and logger.  Likely the value is $5.00-$10.00 per ton depending on what you have, where it is located, and logging difficulty.


Questions to Forester

My 2 brothers and one sister jointly own 350 acres of land in Hardin County Tennessee Please provide for me how you would evaluate the vaue of this timber relative to future value.   REPLY: Essentially, value projections are developed using a combination of annual timber growth estimates and projected growth of the market.  The value figures ($) can include inflation, or be discounted back to today's values ($). 


Questions to Forester

Hello, I've got a plot of private land with 12 to 20 standing black walnuts approx 20 inch to 30 inch dia. 60 ft tall. I'd like to see if it's possible to have someone evaluate them for possible sale. They are in an easy access horse pasture. REPLY: Since you've given us a call, we will be in touch and see what we can work out for you.


Questions to Forester

My Church has seven acers of land which has alot of pines of verious sizes. Was wondering if there is any one who buys them and will harvest them? The land is in north georgia right at the tennessee line at I 75.  REPLY: You can try calling East Brainerd Lumber Company there in Chattanooga (423) 892-0331. 


Questions to Forester

I have two walnut stumps from trees that were over 100 yrs old. I need to know how to price them and find a potential buyer. Do you have any resources of buyers or pricing guides? We are located in NC. Any information you have will be very helpful. Thanks! REPLY: Sorry, but I can't help you with walnut stumps.  I've searched on several occasions but haven't been able to come up with a buyer.  You might talk with consulting foresters in North Carolina to see if they can come up with someone for you.  Look for NC foresters on this site. http://www.acf-foresters.org